When you live in an infoglut (course content)

  1. What is the context in which we are researching, and
  2. Why can’t we just synthesize some articles and move on already?
Anna Haifisch 2016, with permission
Anna Haifisch 2016, with permission
Anna Haifisch 2015, with permission
Anna Haifisch 2015, with permission
Anna Haifisch 2015, with permission
Anna Haifisch 2015, with permission
Anna Haifisch 2016, with permission
Anna Haifisch 2016, with permission
  1. That there are 1,200 petabytes of information on the Internet today — and ignoring the fact that there are 2.5 quintillion bytes of new data created each day — and thus, that every person holding a cell phone holds 1,200 petabytes;
  2. That there were 640 million people on Earth in the 17th century;
  3. That the world’s literacy rate in the 17th century was 7% (the first reliable global literacy rate estimate is 12% in 1820, so here I am making an uneducated guess);
  4. That only measurable information counts as information (thus dismissing things like lived experience); also ignoring the fact that “measurable information” is highly problematic;
  5. That the average lifespan of a literate person anywhere in the world in the 17th century would be similar to estimates of elite class members’ lifespans in Europe specifically — and therefore: 51 years.
  6. That each literate person in the world read an average of 1 page per day from the age of 12 until death at 51 (again, an uneducated guess).
  7. That one page of text equaled two kilobytes (though bytes obviously did not exist in the 17th century)

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